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Things To Do In Cheltenham

Here are some of our favourite places to visit near our Cheltenham sofa store.

Pittville Park and Pump Room

Pittville Park and Pump Room

Opened in 1825, Pittville Park is the largest ornamental park in Cheltenham and features lakes and the magnificent grade 1 listed Pump Room where there is a spa fountain inside where you can taste the spa water that runs underneath the town. The Pump Room is frequently used as a concert hall, especially during the Cheltenham Music Festival.

Cheltenham Racecourse

Cheltenham Racecourse

The Home of Jump Racing & The Cheltenham Festival, including Gold Cup Day. Horse racing has a long history in Cheltenham. The first race meetings in Cheltenham took place in 1815 on Nottingham Hill. In 1829, Cheltenham’s Parish Priest, Reverend Francis Close, preached the evils of horseracing, arousing such strong feelings amongst his congregation that the grandstand was burnt to the ground by protestors! The racecourse was moved to Prestbury Park, its current venue, in 1831.

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill (also known as Cleeve Cloud) is the highest point both of the Cotswolds hill range and of the county of Gloucestershire, at 330 m (1,080 ft). Located on Cheltenham's north-eastern edge, on the way to Winchcombe, affording breath-taking views of Cheltenham and its surroundings, the Malvern Hills and, on a clear day, to the Black Mountains of Wales.

Sudeley Castle and Grounds

Sudeley Castle and Grounds

Sudeley Castle, near the medieval market town of Wincombe offers a spectacular day out in the heart of the beautiful Cotswolds countryside. Grade I listed, the castle has ten notable gardens covering some 15 acres within a 1,200-acre estate. Built in the mid 15th century, Sudeley Castle is the only private castle in England to have a queen buried within the grounds - Queen Katherine Parr, the last and surviving wife of King Henry VIII – who lived and died in the castle.

Bibury Village

Bibury Village

Bibury is a charming, typically Cotswold, village known for its honey-coloured 17th-century stone cottages with steeply pitched roofs, which once housed weavers who supplied cloth for fulling at nearby Arlington Mill. It is around half an hour’s drive from Cheltenham. There are several places to eat and drink in the village or you could buy some picnic ingredients at Bibury Trout Farm Shop or the village shop.

Gloucester Warwickshire Steam Railway

Gloucester Warwickshire Steam Railway

The GWSR is a volunteer-run heritage railway which runs along the Gloucestershire / Worcestershire border in the Cotswolds. This lovely 29 mile round trip from Broadway to Cheltenham Racecourse has glorious views westwards of the Vale of Evesham, the Malverns and Wales, and eastwards the Cotswolds.